Blog

Rain Will Not Stop Me

There was a man who rode to The Salvation Army canteen in the pouring rain on his scooter to pick up food for his family. He was wearing a jump suit with a reflective vest on and plastic grocery bags over his shoes I spoke to him as he picked up boxes of food and he never stopped smiling. We walked back to his scooter together—before his left he called home to let them know he was on his way back home.

By the Blessing of the Lord, I'm Still Here

Anthony sat in the warm Charleston sun with me this morning thankful to be alive. The fiery Carolina sun seems like a comfort to us all after seeing so many dreary, rainy, and tragic days in the past week. As he sat at The Salvation Army mobile feeding kitchen, he began to tell me his story.

Rain, Rain, Go Away.

I woke up this morning to the sound of rain hitting my room's window with the soft rumbles of thunder echoing dimly in the distance. If I were anywhere else, I would have loved to wake up to a rainy day. But, a rainy day in South Carolina is one that is stilled feared by residents- or so I thought.

When There Is Nothing Left, Pray.

When dealing with disasters, even subtle things like our choice of words are important. For example, we always want to refer to those people who we are serving in positive terms. You'll often see the word survivor used. Today I got to meet a group of true survivors.

Food Service Locations - Oct 9

Today The Salvation Army is serving people impacted in the South Carolina floods, feeding and providing emotional and spiritual care. If you need help, the locations are listed below. The Salvation Army strives to meet the need wherever we find it. These locations may change - we will update this list as locations change.

We Are South Carolina And We Are Strong

Today is one of the most emotional days I've had out in the field. I tagged along with the Georgia canteen, which has the largest Salvation Army canteen. This canteen is so big that we had NASCAR help us balance the mobile kitchen so it wouldn't tip over. Better yet, the person driving this canteen helped design it. But that's a story in itself and is coming soon so stay tuned!

Rule Number One: Care for Survivors

As of today, an army of twenty Salvation Army mobile feeding kitchens (canteens) are rolling through South Carolina. Our ground troops are the many Salvation Army officers and trained emergency disaster volunteers who are manning the canteen. Their cargo is desperately needed food and water for people impacted by the flooding. They are armed with compassion and the love of God.

Meeting Human Needs In Jesus Name

I followed a canteen to Eastover, South Carolina. It is a small rural town about 22 miles outside of Columbia. A drive that should have taken 44 minutes became almost two hours because a bridge collapsed and the main road to get to the town was closed.

A Message About Financial Gifts

At this point in our response, financial gifts provide us the best opportunity to meet people's needs. The dynamic nature of disaster response means that we often don't have the logistics to receive the great influx of donated goods. Financial gifts also allow us to purchase items to help bolster the local econony and support the businesses in the affected area.

Bringing Hope to South Carolina

The historic rainfall this past weekend has been life changing for thousands of individuals and families across South Carolina. What you may not have seen are the stories of people coming together to support one another. Neighbors helping neighbors get through a difficult time. This is the spirit of the Carolinas - we are always willing to lend a hand to our neighbors in need.